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He fills the longing soul with good things. Ps. 107:9

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*Repost from the archives 10.1.07

I really love being a housewife. I enjoy taking care of the things my family needs, going through my morning routine – getting things in order.

Today as I ironed, I was praying over my husband’s shirts. (Not because I’m super spiritual. I haven’t remembered to do this for…well, maybe never. But I’ve heard of praying over laundry and I think it’s a great idea). So..I started cracking up because I prayed something like…”Lord, help David to be smart and successful when he wears this shirt.” Duh. I guess it doesn’t take much faith to pray that prayer. Anyone who knows him very well knows he is incredibly smart and extremely with it. Maybe I should pray…”Lord, help my husband to buy me expensive flowers and write me a long mushy letter when he wears this shirt.” Now THAT would be a prayer of faith. Hee hee. I crack myself up.
Anyway….As I ironed one of Kayla’s uniform jumpers I got to the pleats in the front. How appropriate that some call them kick pleats. “Lord…PLEASE help her to stop kicking things at school!”

She’s been – uh – having some challenges at school, you see.

Kayla and I were reading about the right kind of popularity in her devotions the other night. She doesn’t think the kids at school like her. I said,
“Well so-and-so ­­­­­­­likes you!”
“ Huh-UH!”
“Well, he likes to be with you and he tried to kiss you the other day”
“But I didn’t WANT him to!”

(So she bit his shirt!)

Kayla in one of her favorite climbing trees.
This is the self-controlled child I have raised.

I feel like I need to iron all the clothes in my closet and pray over myself! “Dear God, Please help me to know what to do with this child!

The other day David and I went to Purdue on our date. As we drove through the campus, I had this vision of my grown-up, gorgeous, blonde, smart daughter at a university. Far away from her hovering parents. Far away from family devotions. Far away from the safety of our home. I asked David, What will we do if one of our kids wants to come somewhere like this? What if Kayla is supposed to be a doctor and gets a scholarship at a university in California? (We are firm believers that God calls some people to follow their gifts into full-time ministry in a secular environment.)

I can’t even raise a kid who acts right in Kindergarten! How in the world do I think she could survive a secular university?

David simply doesn’t waste words. When he finally gave his thoughts on the subject, it was one word…. “PRAY.”

That’s really so true. I have talked to my friend and coworker about various parenting issues, and she repeatedly reminds me that prayer is our best tool in parenting.

I was talking to my mother-in-law the other day about parenting, and she recalled over the years seeing many mothers sobbing at the altar – grieving over a lost child or their own perceived parenting mistakes.

I recently told someone that I realize I am right now making the parenting mistakes that I’ll someday regret. How’s THAT for positive thinking? But it’s true!

It’s inevitable. I am not going to get it all right. In spite of all my books and schedules and plans and incentives and spankings and creative corrections, my kids are going to have problems and weaknesses. And choices.

As my parenting weaknesses become apparent, trust me – I’m very interested in improving. But I find myself just wanting to figure out a way get it all right! To parent in a way that guarantees the production of 4-6 healthy-eating, emotionally-balanced, hard-working, manners-keeping, scripture-using, creed-quoting children who bless the world, pick up their toys and - of course - never kick or bite their classmates.

But I can’t. And it’s sinking in.

It is once again driving me to my proverbial knees. (Mothers of young ones know that it is a rare occasion we actually make it to the kneeling position and remain awake to tell about it.)

It is helping me, I hope, to be more patient with all the other parents I come into contact with. Someone else’s kid calls my kid a name? “ Lord, help them!” Someone else has a rebellious child? “Lord, give them wisdom!” Someone else’s kid throws a fit in the middle of the store? “Thank you, Lord, that my child would never do that!!” Kidding.

And so I’ll keep reading and praying and trying to do better.
And I’ll keep reminding and reproving and repairing.
And I’ll have to trust my Abba to make up the difference. To correct me where I’m wrong. To feed the hunger for Himself in our kids. To redeem our weaknesses.

(Excuse me…..Right now, at this very minute, my 3-year-old daughter with blonde roots is telling some story about poop as she eats her snack at the table. She’s NOT allowed to do that. How many TIMES must we train them until they get it?!)

I guess I’m encouraging myself in the Lord and letting you listen in. Better get back to my ironing.

Ironing and Parenting*

*Repost from the archives 10.1.07

I really love being a housewife. I enjoy taking care of the things my family needs, going through my morning routine – getting things in order.

Today as I ironed, I was praying over my husband’s shirts. (Not because I’m super spiritual. I haven’t remembered to do this for…well, maybe never. But I’ve heard of praying over laundry and I think it’s a great idea). So..I started cracking up because I prayed something like…”Lord, help David to be smart and successful when he wears this shirt.” Duh. I guess it doesn’t take much faith to pray that prayer. Anyone who knows him very well knows he is incredibly smart and extremely with it. Maybe I should pray…”Lord, help my husband to buy me expensive flowers and write me a long mushy letter when he wears this shirt.” Now THAT would be a prayer of faith. Hee hee. I crack myself up.
Anyway….As I ironed one of Kayla’s uniform jumpers I got to the pleats in the front. How appropriate that some call them kick pleats. “Lord…PLEASE help her to stop kicking things at school!”

She’s been – uh – having some challenges at school, you see.

Kayla and I were reading about the right kind of popularity in her devotions the other night. She doesn’t think the kids at school like her. I said,
“Well so-and-so ­­­­­­­likes you!”
“ Huh-UH!”
“Well, he likes to be with you and he tried to kiss you the other day”
“But I didn’t WANT him to!”

(So she bit his shirt!)

Kayla in one of her favorite climbing trees.
This is the self-controlled child I have raised.

I feel like I need to iron all the clothes in my closet and pray over myself! “Dear God, Please help me to know what to do with this child!

The other day David and I went to Purdue on our date. As we drove through the campus, I had this vision of my grown-up, gorgeous, blonde, smart daughter at a university. Far away from her hovering parents. Far away from family devotions. Far away from the safety of our home. I asked David, What will we do if one of our kids wants to come somewhere like this? What if Kayla is supposed to be a doctor and gets a scholarship at a university in California? (We are firm believers that God calls some people to follow their gifts into full-time ministry in a secular environment.)

I can’t even raise a kid who acts right in Kindergarten! How in the world do I think she could survive a secular university?

David simply doesn’t waste words. When he finally gave his thoughts on the subject, it was one word…. “PRAY.”

That’s really so true. I have talked to my friend and coworker about various parenting issues, and she repeatedly reminds me that prayer is our best tool in parenting.

I was talking to my mother-in-law the other day about parenting, and she recalled over the years seeing many mothers sobbing at the altar – grieving over a lost child or their own perceived parenting mistakes.

I recently told someone that I realize I am right now making the parenting mistakes that I’ll someday regret. How’s THAT for positive thinking? But it’s true!

It’s inevitable. I am not going to get it all right. In spite of all my books and schedules and plans and incentives and spankings and creative corrections, my kids are going to have problems and weaknesses. And choices.

As my parenting weaknesses become apparent, trust me – I’m very interested in improving. But I find myself just wanting to figure out a way get it all right! To parent in a way that guarantees the production of 4-6 healthy-eating, emotionally-balanced, hard-working, manners-keeping, scripture-using, creed-quoting children who bless the world, pick up their toys and - of course - never kick or bite their classmates.

But I can’t. And it’s sinking in.

It is once again driving me to my proverbial knees. (Mothers of young ones know that it is a rare occasion we actually make it to the kneeling position and remain awake to tell about it.)

It is helping me, I hope, to be more patient with all the other parents I come into contact with. Someone else’s kid calls my kid a name? “ Lord, help them!” Someone else has a rebellious child? “Lord, give them wisdom!” Someone else’s kid throws a fit in the middle of the store? “Thank you, Lord, that my child would never do that!!” Kidding.

And so I’ll keep reading and praying and trying to do better.
And I’ll keep reminding and reproving and repairing.
And I’ll have to trust my Abba to make up the difference. To correct me where I’m wrong. To feed the hunger for Himself in our kids. To redeem our weaknesses.

(Excuse me…..Right now, at this very minute, my 3-year-old daughter with blonde roots is telling some story about poop as she eats her snack at the table. She’s NOT allowed to do that. How many TIMES must we train them until they get it?!)

I guess I’m encouraging myself in the Lord and letting you listen in. Better get back to my ironing.



City
by kayla fry

Photo by Molly Porter
She loved the city. She loved the burning in her legs as she rushed down the street. She loved the way her scarf never stayed where she tied it. She loved the buildings leaning in around her. She loved the lights of a million cars zipping past her and a million windows without curtains letting the cold office lights shine out into the even colder darkness. She loved the way each light made a dozen more shadows. She loved the wind that stopped her breath. She loved the screaming, wheezing, shouting, screeching, deafening noise that never stopped, never for a second. She loved the feeling of others’ shoulders pushing and suffocating and moving against her and never stopped, never for a second. She loved the feeling of not being able to speak, to think, to breathe, to do anything other than move and never stop, never for a second. She loved the city, the city that rushed and stayed and leaned and shone and shadowed and stayed and screamed and wheezed and shouted and screeched and deafened and pushed and suffocated and moved and spoke and thought and breathed and moved more, the city that loved, and never stopped, never for a second.
.
.
.
Written at BCWC by Kayla Fry.  10.7.17

City



City
by kayla fry

Photo by Molly Porter
She loved the city. She loved the burning in her legs as she rushed down the street. She loved the way her scarf never stayed where she tied it. She loved the buildings leaning in around her. She loved the lights of a million cars zipping past her and a million windows without curtains letting the cold office lights shine out into the even colder darkness. She loved the way each light made a dozen more shadows. She loved the wind that stopped her breath. She loved the screaming, wheezing, shouting, screeching, deafening noise that never stopped, never for a second. She loved the feeling of others’ shoulders pushing and suffocating and moving against her and never stopped, never for a second. She loved the feeling of not being able to speak, to think, to breathe, to do anything other than move and never stop, never for a second. She loved the city, the city that rushed and stayed and leaned and shone and shadowed and stayed and screamed and wheezed and shouted and screeched and deafened and pushed and suffocated and moved and spoke and thought and breathed and moved more, the city that loved, and never stopped, never for a second.
.
.
.
Written at BCWC by Kayla Fry.  10.7.17

* Repost from 2012 Archives


Yesterday morning I was switching a load of laundry from the washer to the dryer.  It was another good morning, without chaos.  It was about 7 am and my kids were upstairs, dressed and fed (or feeding) and happily making posters for the upcoming student council election at school.

And a moment washed over me.  I knew getting that load of laundry switched over in the morning was a good thing, the kind of thing that keeps a house running.  And it feels good, this feeling of being on top of the laundry.   But then a bit of sadness hit me.

I remember realizing that my mom just didn't seem to struggle with keeping up with laundry.  She went down to the lowest of 4 levels in our huge, gorgeous, tidy home each morning and put a load in, just as easy as breathing (it seems).  She had us fold clothes and match socks together on her bed.  She made us re-use towels more than once and not put our clothes in the laundry if they weren't really dirty.  I have felt sad, before, in moments of being buried under mountains of multi-toddler laundry, that even though I try to do all that, I wasn't quite so with it.  How did she do it so effortlessly and why am I such a doofus?



And although I feel more in control of the laundry situation in my life right now (thanks to a double capacity washer and a load-a-day effort), I still get behind.  Sometimes WAY behind.  All it takes is a couple of back-to-back trips out of town or a few days of pregnancy nausea and exhaustion and before you know it, no one has clean socks and the basement laundry sorter is overflowing.  But it's okay.  Really okay!   I always catch up. (It took me 2 major laundry days this week, but my family once again has clean socks.)


And I just had this moment of giving myself an "it's okay" hug.  And I wanted to give you one, too.  I'm silly and pregnant, but I'm crying now as I write it.  Because it's so easy to beat ourselves up over so many things.  I don't just mean the silly Pinterest-Perfection craze.  I mean regular, every-day, important stuff that we sometimes just don't get done or do wrong.  I had one of those moments this morning as I put baggies of unhealthy corn chips into lunch boxes.....  "Stupid, empty calories.  Not an ounce of nutrition.  I wish I could send carrot sticks and pita/hummus wedges and have lunch pails come home empty.  What have I done wrong?  How could I work so hard and still be such a failure?"

That's the kind of beating-up we sometimes do to ourselves.

And that's why I want to give us all a hug.  It's okay if we don't always keep up.  It's okay if our kids occasionally have to wear dirty socks while we catch up on laundry.  Or (heaven forbid) we send Koolaid and Twinkies in their lunches because we didn't quite get the whole-wheat-zucchini brownies made this week.


All of us are getting at least some things right.

And this is a season.

And it doesn't really matter about that mother of 7 you know whose house looks like a magazine and kids look like models.  She's not you!  She's certainly not me.  But the me that I am is working hard and getting the important things right (at least some of the time.)  And as my kids get a little older and I no longer have multiple toddlers and am enjoying some longer stretches of time to get things done, I realize that this is always going to be a big job, but that someday (like they all say) these little feet will move to bigger places.  And they won't care how perfect I was.  They will care how happy and present I was.



Heaven forbid that I harshly criticize another mom for what she does or doesn't do with her home or kids.  She is learning just like me.  Balancing and failing and growing.  And I hope you never hear me apologize if one of my online pictures has a basket of laundry in it.  My world has laundry.  Always.  Deal with it.

I am trying to accept the fact that it's okay that life brings cycles of order and chaos.  And almost never has times when it's all order and no chaos..there is usually a bit of both going on.

I want to spend less energy feeling sad about what isn't perfect and more energy just enjoying the days and accepting the growth and constant-ness of it all.  I don't want to (emotionally) waste these years worrying and fretting and feeling like a failure.  I want to look back and remember that I cherished the playdoh and kisses and stories and projects and meals with a table surrounded with little faces. 

So I'm just reminding myself that it's okay.  And we are doing a good job!  For some reason we don't hear it very often - I think we mostly hear the messages we conjure ourselves from the very un-real images that bombard us online.  (Closets so organized that there are only 2 colors of coordinated clothes in the whole closet?  Really?!)  Or we hear criticism or disapproval ringing in our memory/imagination.  Or we hear our own voices criticizing ourselves.

But I just wanted to say to myself - and to us - that I think we're doing okay.  And we should relax and enjoy it.  That's all.






It's Okay*

* Repost from 2012 Archives


Yesterday morning I was switching a load of laundry from the washer to the dryer.  It was another good morning, without chaos.  It was about 7 am and my kids were upstairs, dressed and fed (or feeding) and happily making posters for the upcoming student council election at school.

And a moment washed over me.  I knew getting that load of laundry switched over in the morning was a good thing, the kind of thing that keeps a house running.  And it feels good, this feeling of being on top of the laundry.   But then a bit of sadness hit me.

I remember realizing that my mom just didn't seem to struggle with keeping up with laundry.  She went down to the lowest of 4 levels in our huge, gorgeous, tidy home each morning and put a load in, just as easy as breathing (it seems).  She had us fold clothes and match socks together on her bed.  She made us re-use towels more than once and not put our clothes in the laundry if they weren't really dirty.  I have felt sad, before, in moments of being buried under mountains of multi-toddler laundry, that even though I try to do all that, I wasn't quite so with it.  How did she do it so effortlessly and why am I such a doofus?



And although I feel more in control of the laundry situation in my life right now (thanks to a double capacity washer and a load-a-day effort), I still get behind.  Sometimes WAY behind.  All it takes is a couple of back-to-back trips out of town or a few days of pregnancy nausea and exhaustion and before you know it, no one has clean socks and the basement laundry sorter is overflowing.  But it's okay.  Really okay!   I always catch up. (It took me 2 major laundry days this week, but my family once again has clean socks.)


And I just had this moment of giving myself an "it's okay" hug.  And I wanted to give you one, too.  I'm silly and pregnant, but I'm crying now as I write it.  Because it's so easy to beat ourselves up over so many things.  I don't just mean the silly Pinterest-Perfection craze.  I mean regular, every-day, important stuff that we sometimes just don't get done or do wrong.  I had one of those moments this morning as I put baggies of unhealthy corn chips into lunch boxes.....  "Stupid, empty calories.  Not an ounce of nutrition.  I wish I could send carrot sticks and pita/hummus wedges and have lunch pails come home empty.  What have I done wrong?  How could I work so hard and still be such a failure?"

That's the kind of beating-up we sometimes do to ourselves.

And that's why I want to give us all a hug.  It's okay if we don't always keep up.  It's okay if our kids occasionally have to wear dirty socks while we catch up on laundry.  Or (heaven forbid) we send Koolaid and Twinkies in their lunches because we didn't quite get the whole-wheat-zucchini brownies made this week.


All of us are getting at least some things right.

And this is a season.

And it doesn't really matter about that mother of 7 you know whose house looks like a magazine and kids look like models.  She's not you!  She's certainly not me.  But the me that I am is working hard and getting the important things right (at least some of the time.)  And as my kids get a little older and I no longer have multiple toddlers and am enjoying some longer stretches of time to get things done, I realize that this is always going to be a big job, but that someday (like they all say) these little feet will move to bigger places.  And they won't care how perfect I was.  They will care how happy and present I was.



Heaven forbid that I harshly criticize another mom for what she does or doesn't do with her home or kids.  She is learning just like me.  Balancing and failing and growing.  And I hope you never hear me apologize if one of my online pictures has a basket of laundry in it.  My world has laundry.  Always.  Deal with it.

I am trying to accept the fact that it's okay that life brings cycles of order and chaos.  And almost never has times when it's all order and no chaos..there is usually a bit of both going on.

I want to spend less energy feeling sad about what isn't perfect and more energy just enjoying the days and accepting the growth and constant-ness of it all.  I don't want to (emotionally) waste these years worrying and fretting and feeling like a failure.  I want to look back and remember that I cherished the playdoh and kisses and stories and projects and meals with a table surrounded with little faces. 

So I'm just reminding myself that it's okay.  And we are doing a good job!  For some reason we don't hear it very often - I think we mostly hear the messages we conjure ourselves from the very un-real images that bombard us online.  (Closets so organized that there are only 2 colors of coordinated clothes in the whole closet?  Really?!)  Or we hear criticism or disapproval ringing in our memory/imagination.  Or we hear our own voices criticizing ourselves.

But I just wanted to say to myself - and to us - that I think we're doing okay.  And we should relax and enjoy it.  That's all.






Image+-+<b>Eat</b>+<b>a+frog</b>.jpg

Sometimes it's called procrastination.  Or just being busy.  Or having priorities straight.  There are lots of reasons we have frogs hanging around.  We put off the things we dread most.  Or the ones that seem the most daunting, or not as urgent, or not as necessary, or things that will be frustrating or require special tools - or  whatever. 

Anyway...I have a whole list of frogs staring me in the face with their beady eyes.  And I've started chewing.  Kinda rubbery and bitter, to be honest.  But I made a huge dent in one this morning and victory is sweet. 

And it really does seem to be true that it is helpful to eat your frog first thing in the morning.  I'm a "morning routine" girl, and I know there are certain things that I need to get done every day in order to maintain any semblance of order around here.  

BUT

These days, my "morning routine"  actually takes all morning!  Make bed...dress...kids to school...breakfast...dishes....clean kitchen...laundry...feed and change babies...naps  and so forth.  What (in other stages of life) could be an hour or less morning routine for me is actually, discouragingly, an all-morning thing.  So I have adapted my every day routine philosophy.  Sometimes, you need to postpone some of the daily stuff to get something done for tomorrow.  

In other words, my plate is fairly full with the basic tasks of meal prep, laundry maintenance, daily cleaning, etc.  If I'm not careful, I get so busy keeping up with the daily tasks, I never get around to the "future" stuff.  Things that help keep the future smoother...like deeper cleaning, sorting and decluttering clothes and toys, keeping clothes sizes updated and culled for 6 kids, planning and working ahead on projects, deadlines and events that are coming up.  

So I have worked "future" tasks into my daily schedule, but life has a way of happening.  And kids, dishes, laundry, meals and church have a tendency to fill in and overflow the space.  

And then I find myself facing about a hundred thank-you notes that are getting embarrassingly late.  Or the deadline on troubleshooting that computer problem gets frighteningly close.  Or the season threatens to pass without me doing even one of the fun decorating projects I have planned.


So what's a girl to do? 

 Leave the laundry.  Eat the frog.

The laundry will get done.  I promise.  Everyone will eventually start whining that they don't have any underwear.  

But frogs have a tendency to grow into large monsters.  Or to hop away forever.  Or both!

Some frogs aren't big looming  BULLFROG projects.  Some are those little pesky tiny green tree frogs - like a daily task that we tend to put off in the mornings that sortof follows us around all day.   Feeding the dogs on a muddy day.  (I'll clean a hundred toilets and sort all the closets to put off going out there in the mud.) Or maybe exercising. (Everyone knows the hardest step is the one out the door.)  Or getting online and facing the budget numbers head on. (It's so much easier to swipe and pray.)

Catch the frog.  Pin him down.  Hold your nose.  Eat the sucker.  

Here I go.


*repost from the archives



Have You Had Your Frog Today?*

Image+-+<b>Eat</b>+<b>a+frog</b>.jpg

Sometimes it's called procrastination.  Or just being busy.  Or having priorities straight.  There are lots of reasons we have frogs hanging around.  We put off the things we dread most.  Or the ones that seem the most daunting, or not as urgent, or not as necessary, or things that will be frustrating or require special tools - or  whatever. 

Anyway...I have a whole list of frogs staring me in the face with their beady eyes.  And I've started chewing.  Kinda rubbery and bitter, to be honest.  But I made a huge dent in one this morning and victory is sweet. 

And it really does seem to be true that it is helpful to eat your frog first thing in the morning.  I'm a "morning routine" girl, and I know there are certain things that I need to get done every day in order to maintain any semblance of order around here.  

BUT

These days, my "morning routine"  actually takes all morning!  Make bed...dress...kids to school...breakfast...dishes....clean kitchen...laundry...feed and change babies...naps  and so forth.  What (in other stages of life) could be an hour or less morning routine for me is actually, discouragingly, an all-morning thing.  So I have adapted my every day routine philosophy.  Sometimes, you need to postpone some of the daily stuff to get something done for tomorrow.  

In other words, my plate is fairly full with the basic tasks of meal prep, laundry maintenance, daily cleaning, etc.  If I'm not careful, I get so busy keeping up with the daily tasks, I never get around to the "future" stuff.  Things that help keep the future smoother...like deeper cleaning, sorting and decluttering clothes and toys, keeping clothes sizes updated and culled for 6 kids, planning and working ahead on projects, deadlines and events that are coming up.  

So I have worked "future" tasks into my daily schedule, but life has a way of happening.  And kids, dishes, laundry, meals and church have a tendency to fill in and overflow the space.  

And then I find myself facing about a hundred thank-you notes that are getting embarrassingly late.  Or the deadline on troubleshooting that computer problem gets frighteningly close.  Or the season threatens to pass without me doing even one of the fun decorating projects I have planned.


So what's a girl to do? 

 Leave the laundry.  Eat the frog.

The laundry will get done.  I promise.  Everyone will eventually start whining that they don't have any underwear.  

But frogs have a tendency to grow into large monsters.  Or to hop away forever.  Or both!

Some frogs aren't big looming  BULLFROG projects.  Some are those little pesky tiny green tree frogs - like a daily task that we tend to put off in the mornings that sortof follows us around all day.   Feeding the dogs on a muddy day.  (I'll clean a hundred toilets and sort all the closets to put off going out there in the mud.) Or maybe exercising. (Everyone knows the hardest step is the one out the door.)  Or getting online and facing the budget numbers head on. (It's so much easier to swipe and pray.)

Catch the frog.  Pin him down.  Hold your nose.  Eat the sucker.  

Here I go.


*repost from the archives



* Repost from the Archives


A thought for today: 

My mind and my heart want to zoom ahead and see the future.  I feel impatience creeping around the edges of my mind and heart.  I like to know what I’m up against…to be able to plan things out and prepare specifically and make lists and dream specifically.

My Mama and I chat about economies and investments and interest rates and I feel so antsy that today is hands-down one of the best times to buy a house for many, many years.  I've seen the wisdom of small, safe financial steps.   I want to take action!  Be proactive!  But God has us happily planted to wait for His new direction.  No new action necessary.  David comes home from long days of research and writing to tell me he has finished another section of his dissertation (another dead guy checked off the list), the end of a long journey getting nearer.  And I want to rap on God's window and remind Him - just in case He's forgotten..It's time!  We're ready....Poised to take the next step of our journey.  Years of praying and listening and waiting. 

But God draws back no magic curtains revealing new roads.  He gives no long-awaited long-term direction.  

He simply reminds me – today – to take care of today.  To be faithful to that specific area He has called me to Come Up in, just this morning.  

 To keep my focus on  keeping our home and creating peace and safety and purposeful teaching and firm diligent training….to maybe just, for right now, focus on finishing the floor-mopping and folding those 10 loads of clean laundry that have been piling up during a week of back-to-back activities.

He reminds me to of how far I have to go.....to let Him discipline every area of my own life and mind and time.  To be faithful to the everyday priorities that He has forged in me with such time and care.  To be kind and understanding and real.

He reminds me to prepare in every way I can for this baby boy that is growing inside me.  To pray with diligence and passion for the spiritual protection and strength of my children and husband.  To be a happy and present and discerning and supportive wife.

He reminds me to continue – quietly and faithfully -  in the small bit of outside-the-home work He has given me – to training a handful of young musicians and saying yes to the right amount of small ways that I can reach out to others.  

He reminds me over and over - gently but firmly and faithfully - to learn to find power on my knees.  To be becoming the kind of person that I want my children to be.

Goodness - With THAT list, it boggles the mind that I would even have the energy to THINK about tomorrow!  : )

I believe in dreaming and preparing and looking ahead.  But today, Abba has said to me….

"Silly Sarah - Look to today.  Be steadfast in today.  Let Me take care of tomorrow."

He’s Gentle and Faithful and Wise like that.


Today Before Tomorrow*

* Repost from the Archives


A thought for today: 

My mind and my heart want to zoom ahead and see the future.  I feel impatience creeping around the edges of my mind and heart.  I like to know what I’m up against…to be able to plan things out and prepare specifically and make lists and dream specifically.

My Mama and I chat about economies and investments and interest rates and I feel so antsy that today is hands-down one of the best times to buy a house for many, many years.  I've seen the wisdom of small, safe financial steps.   I want to take action!  Be proactive!  But God has us happily planted to wait for His new direction.  No new action necessary.  David comes home from long days of research and writing to tell me he has finished another section of his dissertation (another dead guy checked off the list), the end of a long journey getting nearer.  And I want to rap on God's window and remind Him - just in case He's forgotten..It's time!  We're ready....Poised to take the next step of our journey.  Years of praying and listening and waiting. 

But God draws back no magic curtains revealing new roads.  He gives no long-awaited long-term direction.  

He simply reminds me – today – to take care of today.  To be faithful to that specific area He has called me to Come Up in, just this morning.  

 To keep my focus on  keeping our home and creating peace and safety and purposeful teaching and firm diligent training….to maybe just, for right now, focus on finishing the floor-mopping and folding those 10 loads of clean laundry that have been piling up during a week of back-to-back activities.

He reminds me to of how far I have to go.....to let Him discipline every area of my own life and mind and time.  To be faithful to the everyday priorities that He has forged in me with such time and care.  To be kind and understanding and real.

He reminds me to prepare in every way I can for this baby boy that is growing inside me.  To pray with diligence and passion for the spiritual protection and strength of my children and husband.  To be a happy and present and discerning and supportive wife.

He reminds me to continue – quietly and faithfully -  in the small bit of outside-the-home work He has given me – to training a handful of young musicians and saying yes to the right amount of small ways that I can reach out to others.  

He reminds me over and over - gently but firmly and faithfully - to learn to find power on my knees.  To be becoming the kind of person that I want my children to be.

Goodness - With THAT list, it boggles the mind that I would even have the energy to THINK about tomorrow!  : )

I believe in dreaming and preparing and looking ahead.  But today, Abba has said to me….

"Silly Sarah - Look to today.  Be steadfast in today.  Let Me take care of tomorrow."

He’s Gentle and Faithful and Wise like that.


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